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Tarpon, snapper still top targets

August 14, 2015
By Capt. GEORGE TUNISON (captgeorget3@aol.com) , Cape Coral Daily Breeze

Fresh water rains often take fish off their and your favorite spots. Move around and look for clean and clearer waters.

Offshore find a whole list of possible catches from a few miles off to 30+ miles out. From bottom, reef and rock dwellers, to high speed kingfish, wahoo, and dolphin all are waiting for your bait. Check your weather info, gas up and head off.

Mangrove snapper are here in a big way so go to the passes and cast small pinfish and shrimp bits near the bottom for a tasty dinner. Move around to find the bigger concentrations and carry plenty of tackle as you definitely will lose some or you're probably not in the right location.

Article Photos

Capt. George Tunison

Tarpon are still king in Boca Grande as well as the brown waters of Charlotte Harbor. In the harbor, look for busting ladyfish if you can't spot rollers with your binoculars. When found, tie a 10-inch ladyfish to your hook and float rig and quietly drift though the area while casting a jig and using your trolling motor very sparingly. Wind drift and correct with the electric.

If tarpon are still here so are sharks so don't miss out on light to monster tackle battles with smaller flats sharks of 30 pounds to pass giants weighing as much as your flats boat, motor, and trailer.

Set up near a bar with a channel nearby. Chum blocks, oils, small pieces, get it in the water and start that all important chum slick. With eyes peeled watch for telltale signs of a shark approaching, like a big ol' dorsal fin coming your way. Clients that have never seen this before (while I hum Jaws movie music) get really excited. I still do too as you know this guy is looking to eat and play.

Put out a fine dining choice for him. Start with a smaller ladyfish under a float and a rod with a dead chunk on bottom.

Try a medium 7 1/2 snook rod with 20-pound braid tied to enough mono to handle the fish connected to a foot long piece of wire tied to the mono with a Haywire Twist. Finish with a circle hook and you'll be ready for some awesome, high speed, drag burning runs in shallow water.

TIP: Like a Keys bonefish angler hold that rod tip skyward on long sizzling runs to keep that line away from underwater gremlins with scissors. On the other hand don't go too light in the tackle dept as it's hot and it's not necessary to play any large fish to exhaustion or death in this soup bowl. Take the time to thoroughly revive your fish and, of course, match the tackle to the size fish you're pursuing.

If you're the kind that pays attention to this stuff the new expected fall closing to fishing in most of Biscayne National Park by the National Park Service is a real blow to anglers, taxpayers, and the economy of the area. The NPS has ignored the FWC and conservation group's recommendations in favor of this heavy-handed approach by an out of control Federal Government that continually seeks to limit Americans' right to their waters and lands.

This has been going on for some time nationwide with a monstrously bloated EPA over-regulating inland and National "fisheries management" bodies restricting access and fishing rights of individual sportsmen in favor of commercial fishing interests. More often than not these rule makers are nothing more than political appointees with little to no management experience or simply relatives.

I would ask you to write Sen. Nelson and Sen. Rubio to intercede, but sadly after all the protest our river still carries Lake O's poison pollution right into Cape Coral and beyond.

The squeaking wheel gets the grease. Sadly, Americans, taxpayers, seem to have forgotten how to squeak loudly enough.

Capt. George Tunison is a Cape Coral resident fishing guide. Contact him at 239-282-9434 or captgeorget3@aol.com, or www.flyingfinssportfishing.com.

 
 
 

 

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