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Congress must be part of pact process

December 18, 2015

It probably will require weeks of examining and analyzing the Paris climate change agreement for Americans to understand fully what it means to us....

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aunticorp

Jan-03-16 3:53 PM

The market is huge but the corporate media is not looking out for the citizens. Solar is growing in leaps and bounds (The U.S. solar industry continued on its record-breaking trajectory in Q2 2015 with 1,393 megawatts (MW) of installed solar capacity, making this the largest Q2 in history.... Through the first half of the year, the solar industry has supplied 40% of all new 2015 elecric generating capacity). The problem is it is commercial (centralized production), the most inefficient use of this vital resource.

That ought to set off dinner bell alarms for individual equity opportunities. If there is enough profit in it for business why is OUR GOVERNMENT NOT INCENTIVIZING INDIVIDUAL CITIZENS?

Ans - the corporate media is part of corrupting America to advantage the 1% and pee on the heads of the citizens and telling them it is raining.

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aunticorp

Jan-03-16 3:38 PM

I fought my HOA for 3yrs and the Republican deniers and retired utility homeowners on the board finally killed my initiative (and Fl incentives). I refuse to be party to this climate destruction. I did ok in Tn though (could have done better in NC but love me some Chattanooga). 10kw @ 2.50/watt w/enphase micoinv. Installed. Tn had a 140% (residential rate) for every kwh generated plus $1m state credit. It dropped to 120% this year.

FP&L killed the funding for Florida incentive program. They tremble in face of distributed solar energy production with even the most meager incentive program.

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SAILBOATMAN

Jan-03-16 12:57 PM

Acorp.... You are late to the party. I installed my 5KW system(30 year Mage panels with Enphase microinverters) in June of 2010, and got the huge Florida incentive(at the time) for doing so (over 50% of the cost....$24,000 X 50% = $12,000 rebate(was supposed to be more, but the fund was running out of money)). With 30 year warranty on the panels and 15 years on the microinverters, My system will be paid for in about 3-4 more years. I am only here for about 8 months a year, so I too, produce much more than I use. But that is not the norm. I could have afforded to pay for the entire cost, but the norm is that many cannot. The market is just not large enough to create a growing and sustainable industry in this area..... much larger than it is today, because many people can't simply afford it, as in developing countries, as well. Only huge Govt investments as a result of higher taxes could possibly produce such growth. Healthcare and food is the priority.

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aunticorp

Jan-03-16 12:29 PM

The 1st solar systems are over 45yrs old. BTW my system in Tn only gets 220 av. days of sun and a lot more of them than Fl are low light days. Fl avg sunny days is 246 (the Sunshine State) and will produce considerably more electricity for the buck.

Florida citizens need to fight to get FP&L’s foot of the solar neck. Cape Coral has a way to fight back through the COOP, LCEC.

This matters not to me. I’m leaving.

Just food for thought.

My system will pay for itself around yr 8.? with incentives. Floridians must fight for those incentives (coal and oil have theirs). But even without them mined would pay back by yr 14.

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aunticorp

Jan-03-16 12:14 PM

SBM – indulge me, though you may be just the wrong person to relate. An unrecognized point about “distributed energy production” (solar homes) is the comparison to homestead. It is simply the difference between owning and renting. For the same money (less actually) per mo. one can purchase their energy, pay for it and at the end own a system of near free energy (banks love making this loan). Just like you own the insulation and double paned windows you own your clean, silent electricity generator.

So, as you see you pay for those jobs instead of renting electricity, with all the risks to the grid and price instability at the whim of the market and stockholders (FP&L). Just finished my 1st yr w/solar. Cost me $15m – returned $1700 approx. Parts are all American made and installed and guaranteed for 25rs. With a small cost around yr 30 the 1st solar systems are still producing over 80% of their designed output.

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SAILBOATMAN

Jan-03-16 9:52 AM

All these new jobs are just wonderful. Who will bear the cost of these additional jobs? What about homeowners who now can't even afford their utility bills? What about all those additional jobs in third world and developing countries? Who will pay for those? Just curious, you know.

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aunticorp

Jan-03-16 5:42 AM

Or they may earn royalties based on the project’s annual revenues. Similarly, farmers and rural landowners can generate new sources of supplemental income by producing feedstocks for biomass power facilities. UCS analysis found that a 25 by 2025 national renewable electricity standard would stimulate $263.4 billion in new capital investment for renewable energy technologies, $13.5 billion in new landowner income biomass production and/or wind land lease payments, and $11.5 billion in new property tax revenue for local communities. Renewables keep money circulating within the local economy, and renewable electricity production would reduce the need to spend money on importing coal and natural gas. 38 states were net importers of coal in 2008—from other states and, increasingly, other countries: 16 states spent a total of more than $1.8 billion on coal from as far away as Colombia, Venezuela, and Indonesia, and 11 states spent more than $1 billion each on net coal imports

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aunticorp

Jan-03-16 5:38 AM

In addition to the jobs directly created in the renewable energy industry, growth in renewable energy industry creates positive economic “ripple” effects. For example, industries in the renewable energy supply chain will benefit, and unrelated local businesses will benefit from increased household and business incomes. In addition to creating new jobs, increasing our use of renewable energy offers other important economic development benefits. Local governments collect property and income taxes and other payments from renewable energy project owners. These revenues can help support vital public services, especially in rural communities where projects are often located. Owners of the land on which wind projects are built also often receive lease payments ranging from $3,000 to $6,000 per megawatt of installed capacity, as well as payments for power line easements and road rights-of-way.

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aunticorp

Jan-03-16 5:37 AM

Other renewable energy technologies employ even more workers. In 2011, the solar industry employed approximately 100,000 people on a part-time or full-time basis, including jobs in solar installation, manufacturing, and sales [13]; the hydroelectric power industry employed approximately 250,000 people in 2009 [14]; and in 2010 the geothermal industry employed 5,200 people. Increasing renewable energy has the potential to create still more jobs. In 2009, the Union of Concerned Scientists conducted an analysis of the economic benefits of a 25 percent renewable energy standard by 2025; it found that such a policy would create more than three times as many jobs as producing an equivalent amount of electricity from fossil fuels—resulting in a benefit of 202,000 new jobs in 2025.

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aunticorp

Jan-03-16 5:36 AM

For those who want to know the truth: Jobs and Other Economic Benefits-search this–click ucsusa link Compared to fossil fuel mechanized, capital intensive technologies, the renewable energy industry is more labor-intensive translating - more jobs are created for each unit of electricity generated from renewable sources than from fossil fuels. Renewable energy already supports thousands of jobs in the United States. For example, in 2011, the wind energy industry directly employed 75,000 full-time-equivalent employees in a variety of capacities, including manufacturing, project development, construction and turbine installation, operations and maintenance, transportation and logistics, and financial, legal, and consulting services. More than 500 factories in the United States manufacture parts for wind turbines, and the amount of domestically manufactured equipment used in wind turbines has grown dramatically in recent years: from 35 percent in 2006 to 70 percent in 2011.

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